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    Third-Party Validations

    The effectiveness of natural refrigeration dehumidifiers has been verified by independent testing. Below you will find the results of some of this testing.

    U.S. Department of Energy

    U.S. Department of Energy

    OFFICE OF POWER TECHNOLOGIES - DISTRIBUTED ENERGY RESOURCES Thermally Activated Technology: Desiccant Dehumidifiers

    The desiccant process involves exposing the desiccant to a high relative humidity air stream- allowing it to attract and retain some of the water vapor-In some applications, desiccants can cut cooling loads and peak demand by as much as 50 percent, with significant cost savings.

    Market Potential

    Desiccants can stretch the capacity of existing chillers by increasing system efficiency, potentially eliminating the need to replace a functioning chiller with a larger unit.

    Environmental Benefits

    Reduce condensation on equipment and humidity levels, eliminating growth of mold, mildew, and bacteria.

    Comparative Economic Aspects:

    In order to know the overall economic benefits of using ethylene absorbers, you have to determine the savings due to reduced spoilage and compare it to the cost of absorbers required. Using the example of the shipment to South Korea, the estimated savings due to a reduction in spoilage at destination was $928 while the cost of the absorbers was $160, thus a net benefit of $768 (A 480% Return On Investment)

    British Zeolite Association

    British Zeolite Association

    The BZA was formed in 1977 in order to provide a forum where zeolite scientists could meet to review and share their latest findings. Today the zeolite community in the UK numbers several hundred active research scientists and engineers, from both industry and the academic sector, who reflect the great variety of applications of microporous materials, from catalysis and petrochemical processing to chemical separations, detergents and environmental clean-up.

    The British Zeolite Association exists to promote zeolite science in the UK. It does this through its research conferences, which bring academic and industrial scientists together to discuss the latest developments in the field, by its support for research students, and by other educational programs.

    "Zeolites contribute to a cleaner, safer environment in a great number of ways. In fact nearly every application of zeolites has been driven by environmental concerns, or plays a significant role in reducing waste and energy consumption."

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    Zeolites are a well-established technology used in a range of processes and industries. Zeolites are not new materials—they have been investigated for over two and a half centuries, with stilbite and natrolite both being identified in the 1750s. Industrial applications include catalysis in the petroleum industry (Venuto and Dekker 1979, Chen et al. 1994), various uses in agriculture (St. Cloud 2007, BRZ Zeolite 2007, Zeolite Australia 2007), horticulture (ZeoPro 2007), gas separations (Yang 1994, Kerry 2007, Kanellopoulos 2000), domestic water treatment (McKetta 1999, Kawamura 2000, Faust 1998); and nuclear waste processing (Auerback et al. 2003, Choppin and Khankhasayev 1999). The value of zeolite catalysis to petroleum cracking is well in excess of $200 billion (MassNanoTech 2007). About 50 naturally occurring zeolites have been identified; over 150 synthetic zeolites have been prepared and characterized; and further thousands of combinations of framework and composition are available (MassNanoTech 2007, Baerlocher and McCusker 1996). Zeolites have long been used in the nuclear industry (Auerback et al. 2003, Choppin and Khankhasayev 1999) owing to their properties as ion exchangers. The planned siting of the United States’ first deep geologic radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, where design philosophy called for both engineered and natural barriers (Ahn et al. 1981) to inhibit the transport of any potentially leaking radionuclides, was influenced considerably by the local abundance of the natural zeolites mordenite and clinoptilolite, both of which have large cationic exchange capacities.

    U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Center

    U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Center

    Food Engineering Directorate Use of Ethylene Absorbers in Extending Shelf Life

    Nature of the Problem: Ethylene is a natural plant hormone produced by metabolism in most fruit. It initiates and accelerates the ripening of fruit and causes vegetables to deteriorate. This unavoidable process is a major problem, since in almost all applications noncompatible fruits and vegetables (i.e., ethylene emitters and ethylene sensitive items) are stored and/or shipped in the same container. If we could keep the level of ethylene as low as possible, we would be able to slow the maturation of the fruits, protect the vegetables, and reduce spoilage to a minimum. Technical Strategy: One of the simplest ways to remove ethylene from the atmosphere is to absorb it.

    Field Test:This test was the most controlled of all the field tests to date. In cooperation with DSR-PAC in Alameda, CA, we set up a three-week shipping test to South Korea. Large lots of fresh fruits and vegetables were split and placed into two identical 40 ft. sea vans, one with and one without absorber filters placed near the air inlet to the cooling system operation at 36°F. The produce was inspected by a Quality Assurance Specialist from DSR-PAC and a Natick Project Officer before loading in Alameda and after unloading from the container ship in Pusan, South Korea. The atmosphere in each van was also sampled for the concentration of ethylene. Upon arrival in Pusan, the atmosphere in the test van with the absorber filters had an ethylene concentration of 1.8ppm, while the atmosphere in the control van had 29ppm (more than 16x the concentration). The fruits and vegetables in the absorber-protected van were in excellent condition. In the control van, many of the green leaf vegetables were completely spoiled and most of the fruits were ripe enough for immediate use.

    Product Test Van Control Van
    Cabbage Fresh, crisp, good green color Yellowish green, 11% decay
    Celery Fresh, crisp, 3% decay-tops 100% rot surveyed
    Peas Fresh, green, <1% rot Fresh, green, 14% rot, mold
    Escarole Some decay at tips 100% decay surveyed
    Pears Mostly Firm Firm to ripe, many ripe
    Nectarines Mostly Hard Mostly hard to firm, 13% decay
    Kiwi fruit Mostly firm, 1% decay Mostly ripe, 2% decay

    Comparative Economic Aspects: In order to know the overall economic benefits of using ethylene absorbers, you have to determine the savings due to reduced spoilage and compare it to the cost of absorbers required. Using the example of the shipment to South Korea, the estimated savings due to a reduction in spoilage at destination was $928 while the cost of the absorbers was $160, thus a net benefit of $768 (A 480% Return On Investment)

    Faculty of Fisheries, Cukurova University

    Department of Seafood Processing Technology - Cukurova University, Adana, Turkey

    The influences of natural zeolite (cliptinolite) on ammonia and biogenic amine formation by foodborne pathogen.

    The influence of natural zeolite on biogenic amines (BAs) and ammonia (AMN) production by eight common gram negative and positive foodborne pathogens (FBP) were investigated in histidine decarboxylase broth (HDB). The use of zeolite also significantly suppressed HIS accumulation by E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, S. paratyphi A (P < 0.05). The range of tyramine (TYR) production by gram positive bacteria was 1.19 and 4.06 mg/L for Enteroccus faecalis and Listeria monocytogenes respectively.

    PRACTICAL APPLICATION: Natural zeolites are the main absorptive, low-cost material used in agriculture and industry. Although the effect of zeolite on ammonia formation in some industrial systems is well known, there is limited information regarding the impact of zeolite on biogenic amine (BA) production by food-borne pathogens. The data presented in this article will help us to understand the impact of natural zeolite on BA and ammonia production by eight common food-borne pathogens.

    International Journal of Food Science & Technology

    International Journal of Food Science & Technology

    The impact of applying natural clinoptilolite (zeolite) on the chemical, sensory and microbiological changes of vacuum packed sardine fillets

    Natural zeolite was applied to determine quality changes in vacuum packaged sardine fillets during 19 days at 4 ± 1 °C.

      • Zeolite had an effect to improve sensory quality of sardine especially for removing off-odour.
      • The acceptable shelf life of vacuum packaged sardine was 8 days for control.
      • The acceptable shelf life of vacuum packaged sardine was 12 days for groups treated with zeolite.
      • The zeolite application resulted in significant reduction in total volatile basic nitrogen values.
      • The use of zeolite significantly reduced ammonia and biogenic amine accumulation.

    The result of the study showed that the efficacy of Zeolite to get maximum preservation effect.

    Ice for preserving the freshness of foodstuff

    The impact of applying natural clinoptilolite (zeolite) on the chemical, sensory and microbiological changes of vacuum packed sardine fillets

    An ice keeps the temperature of foodstuff at the freezing point, inhibits the propagation of bacteria or germ, and suppresses the number of bacteria or germs as low as possible. The ice of the present invention comprises a frozen mixture of water and finely divided particles of metal element or metal oxide having sterilizing power.

    The ice of this embodiment is made of a mixture of water and silver-zeolite.

    It can be appreciated from the results obtained by this testing that the growth of bacteria can be inhibited by the solution of more than 125 ppm, and the growth of molds can be inhibited by the solution of more than 500 ppm. Thus, substantially the same results are obtained with respect to bacteria and molds. This means that silver-zeolite is less dependent on the difference of the kind of bacteria and/or molds, i.e. silver-zeolite has substantially the same sterilizing power against any germ. Further, silver-zeolite provides the effect to deodorize the malodor as well as the germicidal power as described herein-above. The deodorant effect is obtained not only by the above-mentioned germicidal power avoiding the malodor inherent on germ themselves, but also by absorbing the malodor itself.

    The ice consist of water and silver-zeolite is adapted to be used by packing it with foodstuff within a container for transportation or preservation of foodstuff. The foodstuff is cooled to the freezing point (approximately 0 by the ice to preserve the freshness thereof.) The ice is adapted to be melted away in the course of time, so that the water from the ice disposed above the foodstuff flows along the surface of the foodstuff to the downward direction. Silver-zeolite included in the ice is also present in the water obtained by melting of the ice, so that silver-zeolite included in the water also sterilizes germs presented on the surface of the foodstuff, preventing the foodstuff from deterioration, and avoids the change of color of the foodstuff due to the effect of germs. The ice of prior art has a disadvantage caused by the water fused therefrom. In other words, the water trapped within the container has become a good medium for growing germ. Whereas, in the case of the ice of the present invention, germs presented in the fused water are all eliminated by the action of silver-zeorite to inhibit the propagation of germs.